A Popular Brand of Baby Wipes Is Accused of Containing PFAS — Details Here

PFAS are the forever chemicals that have been linked to everything from heart disease to cancer.

Lauren Wellbank - Author
By

Jul. 1 2024, Published 12:08 p.m. ET

A baby lays on its back while someone uses a baby wipe
Source: Getty Images

Parents and caregivers will want to pay special attention to a 2023 report that shows several brands of baby wipes with concerning ingredients. The investigation aimed at 15 different popular brands of baby wipes, and of those tested, seven ended up containing unclear or downright concerning ingredients.

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One of the most concerning ingredients found in baby wipes was PFAS, the per and poly-fluoroalkyl substances that are also known as forever chemicals. Keep reading to learn what the story is about when it comes to PFAS in baby wipes, and whether or not your preferred brand is on the list.

A woman hands a baby a baby wipe
Source: Getty Images
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What are PFAS in baby wipes?

PFAS are a group of chemicals that don't readily break down in the environment. Instead, these long-lasting chemicals appear in everything from our water sources to our baby wipes. This is because these chemicals were specially designedto help repel things like water and grease, which is why they have been found in items like mascara and non-stick pans.

Researchers have learned that the convenience of these chemicals has come at a price, and PFAS have been known to cause a range of concerning health conditions that include cancer and thyroid dysfunction. That makes the news that they've been discovered in baby wipes, especially concerning when you consider that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has noted that these chemicals can also cause developmental delays in children, early puberty, behavioral changes, and more.

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One lawsuit alleges Costco's Kirkland baby wipes contain PFAS.

The popular Costco brand Kirkland was among those named by Consumer Reports as containing certain chemicals that the brand says they included because they work as preservatives or help with skin conditioning. Since the report was released, some Costco shoppers have filed a class actional lawsuit against the Costco brand, accusing the company of using dangerous ingredients in their baby products.

The suit specifically calls Kirkland out for allegedly including high levels of PFAS in their fragrance-free baby wipes. According to the Top Class Actions website, the wipes have undergone testing in a private lab, which is where they claim to have uncovered unsafe levels of PFAS in the wipes.

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Do baby wipes have PFAS?

Kirkland wasn't the only brand of baby wipes to get called out by Consumer Reports. WaterWipes, Amazon Elements, Coterie The Wipe, Huggies Natural Care, Pampers Aqua Pure, Pampers Sensitive Baby Wipes, and Seventh Generation all had products that either contained known risks or probable risks, according to the report.

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Unfortunately, baby wipes aren't the only new parent essential that has been called into question. The Environmental Health News website also posted some alarming findings about the presence of PFAS in diapers in 2023. They noted that nearly a quarter of the 65 diapers they tested contained concerning levels of chemicals.

That round of testing included both disposable diapers from popular brands, as well as cloth alternatives, highlighting just how pervasive these forever chemicals are, even when it comes to the products that we use for the most vulnerable among us.

Check out our recs of PFAS-free baby wipes here.

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