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Source: skeeze

Vermont Moves Toward Green Energy With Help From Utility Company

By Nicole Caldwell

Imagine if the role of a utility company wasn’t to make money by charging you for energy, but instead to partner with you on power production. That’s the goal of Green Mountain Power, a local utility company in Vermont making homes, neighborhoods and towns sources of their own energy through a program turning large-scale transmission lines into small-scale power systems. Consider it a glimpse of how power grids will work in the very near future.

A fresh take on how utilities ought to work. 

Green Mountain Power (GMP) in 2014 became the first energy utility company to register as a B Corp, has made headlines in the last several years for doing the unthinkable: actually helping its customers cut down on energy costs. That included the company’s eHome program that offered “energy makeovers” to clients in order to reduce utility bills and conserve resources.

In 2015 the company offered various buying and leasing options for Tesla Powerwall batteries. That program was expanded in May with a new package offering the battery for just $15 every month for 10 years (or a paid-in-full option for $1,500) that includes a Nest thermostat and other software allowing residents to control home energy by app.