You Won't Be Able to Look Away From These Pictures of Wildfire Smoke in New York City

Smoke from the 2023 Central Canada wildfires created dangerous air pollution in New York City. Here are 10 unbelievable photos of the smog.

Anna Garrison - Author
By

Jun. 8 2023, Published 4:06 p.m. ET

One World Trade center as smoke from the Canadian wildfires create a haze in NYC.
Source: Getty Images

Whether you live in the tri-state area or have been watching the news, the 2023 Central Canada wildfires have taken over most conversations. With climate change fueling the wildfires, it's no surprise that North Americans would be concerned about the red-orange smoke haze that took over much of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, and New York in June 2023.

Here are ten photos of the wildfire smoke in New York City to further highlight how urgent the climate emergency is and why you should be paying attention.

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The Statue of Liberty is barely visible through the orange haze.

Photo of the Statue of Liberty as smoke from the Canadian wildfires covers New York City.
Source: Getty Images

Tourists trying to visit the Statue of Liberty or waiting on the shore may have been disappointed when the iconic green lady wasn't visible through the orange smoke in early June 2023.

Can you guess which bridge this is?

View of the Brooklyn Bridge through the orange haze of the 2023 Canada wildfires.
Source: Getty Images

It's almost impossible to see the Brooklyn Bridge through the smoke of the 2023 Canada wildfires that took over New York City. As reported by CNN, many flights were stopped or delayed going into and out of New York City's LaGuardia airport in June due to the unprecedented amount of smoke, making visibility for pilots near impossible.

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The MetroNorth train into Grand Central Station appears filtered in this photo.

Photo of a MetroNorth train line entering Grand Central Station from the Harlem 125th street stop.
Source: Getty Images

If you looked at this photograph years ago, would you know it was from 2023? The orange smoke from the Canadian wildfires is so strong that the view of MetroNorth trains running into Grand Central Station resembles an Instagram filter.

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Bryant Park is bathed in a sickly orange light.

Photograph of the sky above Bryant Park in June 2023 after the Canadian wildfire smoke took over New York City.
Source: Getty Images

Those hoping to catch a bite to eat or relax in the park couldn't do either in this photo of Bryant Park, where the orange haze from the Canadian wildfire smoke is visible. Many buildings that typically reflect the sky were similarly painted a pale peach color thanks to the day's smog.

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The Empire State Building

Photo of the Empire State Building on June 6, 2023, when the Canada wildfire smoke was visible.
Source: Getty Images

Tourists who wanted to see the Empire State Building in June 2023 may have encountered an issue when the Canadian wildfire smoke doused the atmosphere in a thick orange cloud. This photo of the Empire State Building would make any visitor believe they were in Mad Max or Blade Runner.

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A person runs early in the morning under the orange light of day.

Person running near the One World Trade Center as the smoke from the Canadian wildfires paints the sky orange.
Source: Getty Images

Despite an air quality index that urged citizens to remain indoors for their health, someone is out attempting to get their early morning jog in this photo near the One World Trade Center. According to CNY Central, inhaling wildfire smoke is the health equivalent of smoking three to eleven cigarettes daily.

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Smoke surrounds the Queensboro Bridge midday.

Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge as smoke from Canadian wildfires casts an orange haze.
Source: Getty Images

This photo of the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge highlights the contrast between the underside of the bridge and the surrounding orange sky.

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This isn't the moon — it's a photo of the sun in New York City!

The sun appears to have a red haze after smoke from the Canadian wildfires covers New York City.
Source: Getty Images

Don't let this photo fool you — this is not the moon but the morning sun during the height of the Canadian wildfire smoke. The moon was also pictured as red thanks to the wildfire smoke, as reported by CBS News. Matt Sitkowski, science editor-in-chief of The Weather Channel, told CBS that the red appearance was based on how sunlight interacts with smoke particles.

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Commuters combat the haze leaving New York City.

Drivers on the Hutchinson Parkway in the Bronx borough of New York City.
Source: Getty Images

As commuters attempt to enter or leave New York City, blinking signs above them urge visitors and residents to read their air quality alerts to ensure they're prepared for the pollutants in the air. According to the Wall Street Journal, when the air quality is a code "orange" or above, anyone going outside should wear an N-95 mask to protect their lungs.

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Parts of the Lower Manhattan skyline weren't visible due to excess smoke from the wildfires.

The skyline of Lower Manhattan and the Brooklyn Bridge were barely visible due to smoke from the wildfires.
Source: Getty Images

Can you tell what's in this picture? The entirety of Lower Manhattan and the Brooklyn Bridge have completely disappeared in this photograph from June 7, 2023, thanks to the Canadian wildfire smoke taking over the tri-state area.

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