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Source: Fragmentario

Why Designers Are Using Fruits And Vegetables To Dye Their Clothes

By Nicole Caldwell

As a kid, I dabbled in tie-dye, with kits of what I realize now were most likely horrendously poisonous packets of color. But for all their toxicity, the colors did come out significantly more vibrant than when, later on, I experimented with a variety of flowers and leaves that did little more than to turn white fabric a dull, washed-out tan color. Which only teaches me that I should sign up ASAP for one of Maria Elena Pombo’s workshops.   

The designer launched natural dye company Fragmentario in 2016 out of her studio in Bushwick, Brooklyn, where she also sells DIY dying kits and teaches workshops on how to use natural products to create gorgeous dyes for textiles and clothes. The success of those workshops has inspired her to expand her base to Europe, where throughout August and September she’s traveling through Spain and Italy to offer up her services. Fragmentario and other companies like it are indicative of a growing trend in fashion: the belief that what we put on our bodies should be as pure as what we put in them.