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Source: Pixabay

This Paint Reflects Sunlight On Streets To Help Keep Cities Cool

By Brian Spaen

Different colored roads could have a significant impact on how much heat is absorbed during the summer months. For example, Los Angeles, California, will be testing out a grey “cool pavement” called CoolSeal that will likely reflect more of the sunlight and thus decrease the urban heat island that many metropolitan areas deal with. Should it be successful, it could see widespread adoption across the country.

The urban heat island (UHI) is an area in the city that’s much warmer than its surroundings. This is generated from the environment (such as extremely warm weather) and human modification. As cities get bigger, they’ll likely boost their UHI. Increasing temperature within cities creates major problems, such as impacting air and water quality with more pollutants. This affects not only our health, but the environment, as well.

This spawned the development of CoolSeal by GuardTop, a paint that goes over black asphalt to reflect the sun’s energy. Normal roads can absorb up to 95 percent of sunlight with standard black asphalt. In hot summer months, that would significantly jump up the UHI temperature. This gray paint that’s plastered on the top of these roads could decrease street temperatures by 12 degrees Farenheit, according to Seeker.