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Source: Jan Bitter

An Architect Has Designed A Building That Purifies The Air

By Aimee Lutkin

Architect Daniel Libeskind is a famous designer of Polish-Jewish descent, who's known for his structures all over the world. In Germany, he was tasked with the honor of designing the Jewish Museum Berlin, where citizens and tourists go to learn about the Holocaust and visit in remembrance. Libeskind, however, also often takes on projects of a more practical nature, though he incorporates his perspective on life into all his work.

“Even as my studio is often called upon to design skyscrapers these days, I continue to love to build homes, the basic unit of human life,” Libeskind told Inhabitat.

In 2015 Libeskind released his plans for a metallic, zig-zagged shaped building for central Berlin. The asymmetric windows were planned to take advantage of natural light, and the exterior of the building was also designed to be pleasing to the eye. The facade is etched with an eye-catching geometric pattern. But the real draw of the building's outside walls is the material that's been used to build them: ceramic tiles, which consume carbon dioxide and then release oxygen back into the air.

The scaffolding just came off our project Sapphire in Berlin...the result is surreal!

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