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Source: Pexels

The Ozone Layer Is Recovering From Depletion

By Kristin Hunt

The ozone layer appears to be healing itself, after years of depletion due to harsh man-made chemicals. According to the UN, the ozone layer is recovering at a rate of 1-3 percent per decade, and may heal completely by 2060.

The latest report on ozone depletion — conducted every four years by UN Environment, NASA, NOAA, the World Meteorological Organization, and the European Commission — found hopeful signs of recovery. Since 2000, researchers have noticed an increase in upper stratospheric ozone of 1-3 percent per decade, excluding polar regions. What’s going on there? The hole in the ozone over the Antarctic continues to occur each year, though researchers believe severe depletion has been avoided and that even this patch is closing up.

At the current rate, the ozone over the northern hemisphere and mid-latitude are on track to heal by the 2030s, with the southern hemisphere following in the 2050s, and the polar regions by 2060.