LOLI
This Beauty Company Gives You DIY Raw Ingredients To Cut Out Waste From Products

If you've read the labels on a face mask lately, you know that most ingredients are things you can't pronounce and more concerning, it's probably stuff you don't actually want your skin absorbing. There's also so many ingredients and the more there are, the more difficult it is to know if they've been sustainably and ethically sourced. A new start up company called LOLI from founder Tina Hedges, a former executive at L’Oreal and Estée Lauder, is considering all aspects of the process. 

Fast Company reports that LOLI sells their products in kits that are composed of ingredients, which users then mix together when they're ready to use them. Their recipes are categorized as Clean, Hydrate, and Treat. You can select a base, then personalize it with add-ins. The add-ins are items like willow bark or sea buckthorn seed oil. Not exactly stuff you pick up at the grocery store, but all items that are clearly connected to organic material rather than synthetic chemicals.

Making skincare products at home is not a new idea. People have been caring for and nourishing their skin with natural materials in the DIY scene for years, but LOLI wants to reconnect folks to the much vaster human history of using raw ingredients to promote health. Their products eliminate much of the water and synthetic fillers found in over the counter products, but also make it more convenient for people just learning to mix their own moisturizers.

LOLI is also the only beauty company to be a member of Made In A Free World, which monitors products for connections to human trafficking. On their website, LOLI writes, "We don't believe anyone should build their happiness on top of someone else's unhappiness." A dollar for every purchase made of $75 is donated to non-profits focused on the issue of exploited workers.

And if you order LOLI, the products will arrive in an up-cycled cardboard box and compostable bags. Great for the Earth and for your face.

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